Programs

Policy Advocacy and Networking

HomeNet SEA sees the need for the development of national policies on homework that “promote equality of treatment between homeworkers and other wage earners” in such areas as the right to organize, protection against discrimination, remuneration, occupational safety and health, social security protection, and training. This is mandated by the ILO Convention on Home Work, adopted in 1996 after a…

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Programs

Social Protection

HomeNet SEA led a CIDA-SEAGEP-supported project on the documentation of social protection schemes in Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand.. The project aimed to collect information on existing programs of social welfare, social insurance, and social assistance among workers in the informal economy in the three countries. The project has helped the three national HomeNets to review and compare the existing social…

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Programs

Leadership Training

HomeNet Southeast Asia, with support from CIDA-SEAGEP, initiated its Leadership Training Program in 2001 to strengthen the capacity of homeworker leaders in Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia. The Program was designed together by a planning committee in which the three countries were represented The committee agreed on the component modules of the Program, and it was implemented in the three countries…

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Programs

Mapping and Other Forms of Research

Where are the homeworkers? What work do they do? For whom and with whom do they work? What resources do they have? What are their working and living conditions. their problems and needs? These are some of the questions that could be answered through mapping as a research methodology. Homenet Southeast Asia conducted a mapping workshop on March 15-16 ,2001…

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Programs

Planning and Coordinating

To provide an opportunity for Homenet Southeast Asia members to review and plan their activities at the national and regional levels, the Southeast Asia workshop was organized during September 20-21,2000 ,in Bangkok under the auspices of CIDA-SEAGEP. Forty-eight participants and observers put their heads together in charting the path for the national and regional networks in the first years of…

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FAQ

How has globalisation affected homebased work?

Globalisation is sweeping across the Asian region and radically altering the social and economic environment of countries as well as having a differing impact on women and men. Women’s roles in the economies of the region are strong and increasing, yet they are to be found in the most vulnerable sectors of both employment and business. The deregulation of markets,…

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FAQ

Who are the homeworkers?

The majority of homeworkers are women, who take up this form of employment as a way of earning an income to support themselves and their families. Homework is seen as a way of combining the unpaid work of family care, with earning a paid income. While there are positive aspects to homebased work, such as flexible hours which allow women…

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FAQ

Why are homeworkers called the ‘invisible’ workforce?

Homeworkers are members of the expanding workforce of people working informally, often outside legal protection. Homeworkers are the most invisible of all workers as most of them are women working in their own homes. According to the ILO, homework is women’s work almost by definition, so it is not surprising that it is often wrongly confused with housework or domestic…

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FAQ

What’s the importance of homebased work?

This is the most vital question. Homebased work spans continents and centuries. Some of the oldest forms of work, such as weaving and spinning, were done at home. Today, some of the latest forms of work connected with computer technology and modern telecommunications are increasingly taking place in homebased work sites. Homebased work is, in fact, a vital and growing…

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FAQ

What are the different types of home-based worker?

Basically, there are two principal types: the piece-rate worker who works for an employer or intermediary and the own-account worker who does her or his own marketing. The piece-rate worker. She gets her raw materials from a trader, contractor, employer, or firm, makes them into finished goods at home, and delivers them to the same person. Rarely does she have…

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